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How relevant is your logo design?

May 14, 2014
By
Ekaterina Moustafina

Logos... Logos are a very exciting piece of... Art? Business? Both!?
We are obsessed with them, we seem them everywhere, we wear them, we drive them, we eat & drink them and are ready to pay exorbitant prices for some. Just as the prices for logos, professionals seem to have different opinions about a logo's weight on an organization's image.

David Airey in his blog post: “Beyond the logo” presents us with a few opinions of design industry veterans. Designers such as Paul Rand, Andrew Sabatier, Michael Johnson, and Michael Bierut go about suggesting that the logo is not what makes the company's sales. It is rather the company's customer service, quality of the product, longevity, uniqueness of design etc. that define the company and drive the sales up. The logo on the other hand is a visual representation of the reputation that the company has secured for itself.

In spite of this, it isn't to say that you shouldn't be paying attention to the logo design. As we've established, the logo is a visual representation of what your organization stands for, how it defines itself. Therefore even if it is not the logo that will help the company achieve record sales, we want to make sure that what does drive our sales up and customers in, is accurately represented and appealing to the eye. Paul Rand in his article “Logos, Flags, and Escutcheons” where he warns against unnecessary logo redesign states:

“If a design can be refined, without disturbing its image, it seems reasonable to do so. A logo, after all, is an instrument of pride and should be shown at its best.
If, in the business of communications, “image is king,” the essence of this image, the logo, is a jewel in its crown.”

Types, styles, colors, fonts do go out of style. If your logo design is outdated, it might give the wrong impression about where your business is in terms of progress and being ahead of the game. As Armit Vitt from UnderConsideration says that for a designer redesigning a logo is not such an easy task: “Stay to close to the original and you risk not making an impact, stay too far and you might eliminate your client’s core audience”. Therefore a creative charged with the task of redesigning a logo has to carefully examine the changes that the company has gone through from the time of the initial design. Perhaps the core audience at that time was different from what it is today. Armin mentions an interesting website Brand New that showcases logo redesign projects that can be used as inspiration.

Stay tuned, next time we will get into more details of a successful logo design.

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